Tag Archives: Institution Building

From Liberation to Governance: The Eritrean Experience

"This presentation was delivered by Yemane Ghebremeskel, Director, Office of the President of Eritrea, and is intended to elaborate and highlight Eritrea’s views and perspectives on the putative controversies or conjectures that surround the central theme of the workshop, “From Liberation Movements to Government – Past legacies and the challenges of transition in Africa” jointly organized by Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, in cooperation with the South African think-tank, the Brenthurst Foundation in 2012. In light of the many narratives presented about Eritrea, its people and government by Ethiopia and its surrogates in the Eritrean Quislings League (EQL),  some western anthropologists, NGO networks and the media, on the issue of governance and liberation movements, it is this author’s opinion that we ought to defer to those with first hand knowledge and experience." - Sophia Tesfamariam
This presentation was delivered by Yemane Ghebremeskel, Director, Office of the President of Eritrea, and is intended to elaborate and highlight Eritrea’s views and perspectives on the putative controversies or conjectures that surround the central theme of the workshop, “From Liberation Movements to Government – Past legacies and the challenges of transition in Africa” jointly organized by Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung, in cooperation with the South African think-tank, the Brenthurst Foundation in 2012. In light of the many narratives presented about Eritrea, its people and government by Ethiopia and its surrogates in the Eritrean Quislings League (EQL), some western anthropologists, NGO networks and the media, on the issue of governance and liberation movements, it is this author’s opinion that we ought to defer to those with first hand knowledge and experience.

By Yemane Ghebremeskel,

ONE vexing question that we have to address at the outset is whether standardized benchmarks and templates can be employed to assess and synthesize the individual experiences and perspectives so as to infer or formulate a generalized, even if approximated, theory.

I personally believe that the distinct historical and societal realities under which the various liberation movements were conceived and had to operate; the profound variations in the depth, maturity and relevance of the philosophical precepts that they espoused; the disparate dynamics of their internal political landscapes; as well as the specific and at times epochal external environments that influenced their trajectories both during and after liberation render the formulation of any generalized, approximated, theory an elusive task indeed. Continue reading From Liberation to Governance: The Eritrean Experience