Eritrea Responds to Leaked Monitoring Group Report

Denying Eritrea for full and timely access to the periodic reports and produce no material evidence becomes the two norms of the Monitoring Group
Denying Eritrea for full and timely access to the periodic reports and produce no material evidence becomes the two norms of the Monitoring Group

By Inner City Press,

The dysfunction of the UN’s sanctions committees is exemplified by the current Eritrea report. There was no consensus on releasing it, as some argued there was no evidentiary support for its claims. But it was, predictably, leaked to Reuters which rather than put it online cherry picked its view.

But tellingly, the country at issue, Eritrea, tells Inner City Press it has not been provided with a copy of the report. That is dysfunction.

For once with a country mentioned (and slandered, it says) in sanctions reports is a member of the Council: Rwanda. And the questions it has asked, for example of Department of Peacekeeping Operations chief Herve Ladsous, have not been answered. But at least Rwanda is in the room. Eritrea is not.

Given that imbalance, Inner City Press will for now publish this from the Eritrean Mission to the UN:

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Download (PDF, 119KB)



10 thoughts on “Eritrea Responds to Leaked Monitoring Group Report

  1. The UN officials should produce such reports to keep their job and earn thousands of dollars at the expense of poor Africal peaople. They need to create problems so that they keep the thousands of dollars flowing to their accounts. What is saddizm if this is not!

    Eritreans will outgrow the saddists.

  2. Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Friday, 19 July 2013, 5:02 pm
    Press Release: US State Department

    U.S. Mission to the United Nations: Remarks at the Security Council Stakeout Following Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Good afternoon, everyone. Sorry to be so late. I hope you had a chance to eat something beforehand. Let me say a couple things about this morning’s session, and then I’ll take a couple questions. This morning, Under-Secretary-General Hervé Ladsous reviewed the progress and challenges in Côte d’Ivoire. Ladsous noted that while President Ouattara has introduced important political and economic reforms, the pace of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of the country’s estimated 65,000 former combatants remains uneven.

    [ bla … bla …. bla …]

    Turning now to the Horn of Africa. Republic of Korea Ambassador Kim Sook, in his capacity as the Chair of the Somalia/Eritrea Sanctions Committee, briefed the Council on the Committee’s work over the last 180 days, including Committee deliberations over the Somalia/Eritrea Monitoring Group’s Final Report.

    Council members had a good discussion related to a number of key issues concerning Somalia and Eritrea. Council members roundly expressed concern that Al Shabaab continues to benefit from the banned charcoal trade and poses a serious threat to Somalia and the region.

    We also discussed the significant progress the Somali Government has made, as well as the challenges it still faces, particularly in the areas of security sector reform, management of public finances and strict compliance with sanctions measures.

    Finally, Council members also spoke about the role of regional governments and the need for all regional partners to work toward building a peaceful, stable Somalia, including by implementing sanctions obligations. With that, I’m happy to take a couple of questions.

    Reporter: Mr. Ambassador, could you tell us the status of the report—the Panel of Experts report—on the Somalia/Eritrea sanctions issue? If there was a discussion of its release and what the problems are?

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Well, there are two reports – the Somalia report and the Eritrea report. The Somalia report was released, and we remain deeply troubled by some of the Monitoring Group’s findings, and we encourage the Eritrean Government to play a productive role in the region. With respect to the other, as it remains with the Committee, it’s still a confidential document, and we’ll continue to discuss the release of it. But beyond that I’m really not able to make any further comment about it.
    https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO1307/S00503/cons

  3. Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Friday, 19 July 2013, 5:02 pm
    Press Release: US State Department

    U.S. Mission to the United Nations: Remarks at the Security Council Stakeout Following Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Good afternoon, everyone. Sorry to be so late. I hope you had a chance to eat something beforehand. Let me say a couple things about this morning’s session, and then I’ll take a couple questions. This morning, Under-Secretary-General Hervé Ladsous reviewed the progress and challenges in Côte d’Ivoire. Ladsous noted that while President Ouattara has introduced important political and economic reforms, the pace of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of the country’s estimated 65,000 former combatants remains uneven.

    [ bla … bla …. bla …]

    Turning now to the Horn of Africa. Republic of Korea Ambassador Kim Sook, in his capacity as the Chair of the Somalia/Eritrea Sanctions Committee, briefed the Council on the Committee’s work over the last 180 days, including Committee deliberations over the Somalia/Eritrea Monitoring Group’s Final Report.

    Council members had a good discussion related to a number of key issues concerning Somalia and Eritrea. Council members roundly expressed concern that Al Shabaab continues to benefit from the banned charcoal trade and poses a serious threat to Somalia and the region.

    We also discussed the significant progress the Somali Government has made, as well as the challenges it still faces, particularly in the areas of security sector reform, management of public finances and strict compliance with sanctions measures.

    Finally, Council members also spoke about the role of regional governments and the need for all regional partners to work toward building a peaceful, stable Somalia, including by implementing sanctions obligations. With that, I’m happy to take a couple of questions.

    Reporter: Mr. Ambassador, could you tell us the status of the report—the Panel of Experts report—on the Somalia/Eritrea sanctions issue? If there was a discussion of its release and what the problems are?

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Well, there are two reports – the Somalia report and the Eritrea report. The Somalia report was released, and we remain deeply troubled by some of the Monitoring Group’s findings, and we encourage the Eritrean Government to play a productive role in the region. With respect to the other, as it remains with the Committee, it’s still a confidential document, and we’ll continue to discuss the release of it. But beyond that I’m really not able to make any further comment about it.
    https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO1307/S00503/cons

  4. Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Friday, 19 July 2013, 5:02 pm
    Press Release: US State Department

    U.S. Mission to the United Nations: Remarks at the Security Council Stakeout Following Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Good afternoon, everyone. Sorry to be so late. I hope you had a chance to eat something beforehand. Let me say a couple things about this morning’s session, and then I’ll take a couple questions. This morning, Under-Secretary-General Hervé Ladsous reviewed the progress and challenges in Côte d’Ivoire. Ladsous noted that while President Ouattara has introduced important political and economic reforms, the pace of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of the country’s estimated 65,000 former combatants remains uneven.

    [ bla … bla …. bla …]

    Turning now to the Horn of Africa. Republic of Korea Ambassador Kim Sook, in his capacity as the Chair of the Somalia/Eritrea Sanctions Committee, briefed the Council on the Committee’s work over the last 180 days, including Committee deliberations over the Somalia/Eritrea Monitoring Group’s Final Report.

    Council members had a good discussion related to a number of key issues concerning Somalia and Eritrea. Council members roundly expressed concern that Al Shabaab continues to benefit from the banned charcoal trade and poses a serious threat to Somalia and the region.

    We also discussed the significant progress the Somali Government has made, as well as the challenges it still faces, particularly in the areas of security sector reform, management of public finances and strict compliance with sanctions measures.

    Finally, Council members also spoke about the role of regional governments and the need for all regional partners to work toward building a peaceful, stable Somalia, including by implementing sanctions obligations. With that, I’m happy to take a couple of questions.

    Reporter: Mr. Ambassador, could you tell us the status of the report—the Panel of Experts report—on the Somalia/Eritrea sanctions issue? If there was a discussion of its release and what the problems are?

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Well, there are two reports – the Somalia report and the Eritrea report. The Somalia report was released, and we remain deeply troubled by some of the Monitoring Group’s findings, and we encourage the Eritrean Government to play a productive role in the region. With respect to the other, as it remains with the Committee, it’s still a confidential document, and we’ll continue to discuss the release of it. But beyond that I’m really not able to make any further comment about it.
    https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO1307/S00503/cons

  5. Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Friday, 19 July 2013, 5:02 pm
    Press Release: US State Department

    U.S. Mission to the United Nations: Remarks at the Security Council Stakeout Following Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Good afternoon, everyone. Sorry to be so late. I hope you had a chance to eat something beforehand. Let me say a couple things about this morning’s session, and then I’ll take a couple questions. This morning, Under-Secretary-General Hervé Ladsous reviewed the progress and challenges in Côte d’Ivoire. Ladsous noted that while President Ouattara has introduced important political and economic reforms, the pace of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of the country’s estimated 65,000 former combatants remains uneven.

    [ bla … bla …. bla …]

    Turning now to the Horn of Africa. Republic of Korea Ambassador Kim Sook, in his capacity as the Chair of the Somalia/Eritrea Sanctions Committee, briefed the Council on the Committee’s work over the last 180 days, including Committee deliberations over the Somalia/Eritrea Monitoring Group’s Final Report.

    Council members had a good discussion related to a number of key issues concerning Somalia and Eritrea. Council members roundly expressed concern that Al Shabaab continues to benefit from the banned charcoal trade and poses a serious threat to Somalia and the region.

    We also discussed the significant progress the Somali Government has made, as well as the challenges it still faces, particularly in the areas of security sector reform, management of public finances and strict compliance with sanctions measures.

    Finally, Council members also spoke about the role of regional governments and the need for all regional partners to work toward building a peaceful, stable Somalia, including by implementing sanctions obligations. With that, I’m happy to take a couple of questions.

    Reporter: Mr. Ambassador, could you tell us the status of the report—the Panel of Experts report—on the Somalia/Eritrea sanctions issue? If there was a discussion of its release and what the problems are?

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Well, there are two reports – the Somalia report and the Eritrea report. The Somalia report was released, and we remain deeply troubled by some of the Monitoring Group’s findings, and we encourage the Eritrean Government to play a productive role in the region. With respect to the other, as it remains with the Committee, it’s still a confidential document, and we’ll continue to discuss the release of it. But beyond that I’m really not able to make any further comment about it.
    https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO1307/S00503/cons

  6. Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Friday, 19 July 2013, 5:02 pm
    Press Release: US State Department

    U.S. Mission to the United Nations: Remarks at the Security Council Stakeout Following Consultations on Côte d’Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Good afternoon, everyone. Sorry to be so late. I hope you had a chance to eat something beforehand. Let me say a couple things about this morning’s session, and then I’ll take a couple questions. This morning, Under-Secretary-General Hervé Ladsous reviewed the progress and challenges in Côte d’Ivoire. Ladsous noted that while President Ouattara has introduced important political and economic reforms, the pace of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of the country’s estimated 65,000 former combatants remains uneven.

    [ bla … bla …. bla …]

    Turning now to the Horn of Africa. Republic of Korea Ambassador Kim Sook, in his capacity as the Chair of the Somalia/Eritrea Sanctions Committee, briefed the Council on the Committee’s work over the last 180 days, including Committee deliberations over the Somalia/Eritrea Monitoring Group’s Final Report.

    Council members had a good discussion related to a number of key issues concerning Somalia and Eritrea. Council members roundly expressed concern that Al Shabaab continues to benefit from the banned charcoal trade and poses a serious threat to Somalia and the region.

    We also discussed the significant progress the Somali Government has made, as well as the challenges it still faces, particularly in the areas of security sector reform, management of public finances and strict compliance with sanctions measures.

    Finally, Council members also spoke about the role of regional governments and the need for all regional partners to work toward building a peaceful, stable Somalia, including by implementing sanctions obligations. With that, I’m happy to take a couple of questions.

    Reporter: Mr. Ambassador, could you tell us the status of the report—the Panel of Experts report—on the Somalia/Eritrea sanctions issue? If there was a discussion of its release and what the problems are?

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Well, there are two reports – the Somalia report and the Eritrea report. The Somalia report was released, and we remain deeply troubled by some of the Monitoring Group’s findings, and we encourage the Eritrean Government to play a productive role in the region. With respect to the other, as it remains with the Committee, it’s still a confidential document, and we’ll continue to discuss the release of it. But beyond that I’m really not able to make any further comment about it.
    https://www.scoop.co.nz/stories/WO1307/S00503/cons

  7. Consultations on Côte d'Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Friday, 19 July 2013, 5:02 pm
    Press Release: US State Department

    U.S. Mission to the United Nations: Remarks at the Security Council Stakeout Following Consultations on Côte d'Ivoire, Somalia and Eritrea

    Ambassador DeLaurentis: Good afternoon, everyone. Sorry to be so late. I hope you had a chance to eat something beforehand. Let me say a couple things about this morning’s session, and then I’ll take a couple questions. This morning, Under-Secretary-General Hervé Ladsous reviewed the progress and challenges in Côte d’Ivoire. Ladsous noted that while President Ouattara has introduced important political and economic reforms, the pace of disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration of the country’s estimated 65,000 former combatants remains uneven.

    Ladsous indicated that the security situation, especially along the Ivoirian-Liberian border, remains fragile, and reported on the efforts of UNOCI and UNMIL to assist the governments of Côte d’Ivoire and Liberia to improve cross-border security. He also noted that inter-mission cooperation between UNOCI and the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali—MINUSMA—is currently being considered. Council members noted progress in some areas and remaining challenges, including the security situation.

    In my national capacity, I would like to note that the United States welcomes the important progress Côte d’Ivoire has achieved since the post-electoral crisis. We remain concerned that insufficient progress on national reconciliation and SSR/DDR threatens to undermine these gains and continue to urge the Ivoirian Government to redouble its commitment to professionalizing the security forces, to investigate the crimes committed by all sides in the post-electoral conflict, and to address the underlying causes of conflict. As we review and consider UNOCI’s mandate, we must keep in mind the Council’s responsibility to help safeguard the region against a return to violence.

  8. Pingback: Eritrea Pledges Support to Somalia Government - iNewp.com

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